Back to a World of Jewelry
PAUL FLATO:

RISE AND FALL OF ONE OF AMERICA'S GREATEST JEWELERS


As part of Shira Ghaffari’s series of articles exploring the jewelry world, we look into the extraordinary life and works of American jeweler, Paul Flato.


Flamboyant, creative and controversial: Paul Flato is definitely one of the most intriguing figures in American jewelry history. Celebrated in the pages of Vogue and Harper’s Bazaar, his stylish and innovative designs made him a star amongst stars: between the 1930’s and the 1940’s, America’s high society enjoyed enthusiastically Flato’s jewelry, from Los Angeles to New York City, everyone wore his creations.

His story is as fascinating as his pieces and depicts the rise and downfall of a dazzling man who’s fame and misfortunes can be attributed to his outgoing and daring personality.

Paul Flato portait, ca.1937.

Paul Flato portait, ca.1937.

Paul Edmund Flato was born in 1900 in Shiner, Texas, into an upper class family who exposed him from childhood to high society’s fashionable and elegant style: privileged and with a keen eye for beauty, he developed quickly a witty imagination.

After graduating from high school, he decided to attend the University of Texas, in Austin, as a pre-med student, but his college career wasn’t very fruitful as after only passing a few exams he realised that a medical future wasn’t for him.

Driven by ambition, in 1920, he left once again to study economics at Columbia University, in New York City; unfortunately, this time, his academic career was halted by his family, who cut him off from his allowance after refusing their pleas to come home.

Paul Flato, ca.1904.

Paul Flato, ca.1904.

Paul Flato with his father, ca.1935.

Paul Flato with his father, ca.1935.

Nevertheless, stubborn and determined as he was, he decided to stay in the big apple and make a name for himself. After dropping out of University, he began working as an apprentice with jeweler Edmund Frisch on 576th Fifth Avenue.


Charming and entertaining, Paul Flato, in just a couple of years, thanks to the remnants of his allowance, the help of a friend at Tiffany & Co. and his increasingly upscale connections, was able to open his own jewelry shop at One East 57th street, at the corner of 5th Avenue, in Manhattan.

Edmund Frisch pearl brooch adv., ca.1938.

Edmund Frisch pearl brooch adv., ca.1938.

Paul Flato's New York boutique, ca.1933.

Paul Flato's New York boutique, ca.1933.

His early career was strictly intertwined with old relations at Columbia University, as friends matured, they needed graduation gifts and engagements rings, so Paul Flato’s business steadily grew: by the age of 27, he had already achieved over $1 million worth of sales.

In the late 1930’s Paul Flato began to establish a business relationship with a then relatively unknown diamond wholesale dealer, named Harry Winston, becoming rapidly his largest client.

Notable examples of this collaboration include a strand of eighty-five graduated natural pearls clasped by Golconda diamond, 4ct, and a necklace designed by Flato to compliment Harry Winston’s famous Jonker diamond, 125.65ct.

Brenda Frazier, Debutante of the year, modeling the Jonker diamond, 1938.

Brenda Frazier, Debutante of the year, modeling the Jonker diamond, 1938.

Detail of Harry Winston's Jonker white diamond, 125.65ct, set into a necklace by Paul Flato, 1938.

Detail of Harry Winston's Jonker white diamond, 125.65ct, set into a necklace by Paul Flato, 1938.

Paul Flato’s ideas were often theatrical, his wit and imagination were always displayed with originality through his pieces.

Famous examples include the “Deaf and Dumb” brooch series, thought to be inspired by Flato’s own hearing impairment, and singular creations, in fashion with the artistic movements of the time, styled as cactuses, radishes, nuts, bolts, envelopes, gold boxer shorts and feet.

Pair of diamond, ruby and gold brooches by Paul Flato, ca.1940.

Pair of diamond, ruby and gold brooches by Paul Flato, ca.1940.

Emerald and diamond brooches by Paul Flato, ca. 1940.

Emerald and diamond brooches by Paul Flato, ca. 1940.

Nut and Bolt 18K gold cufflinks by Paul Flato, ca. 1960.

Nut and Bolt 18K gold cufflinks by Paul Flato, ca. 1960.

Despite creating some of the most extraordinary pieces of his time, Paul Flato did not have a design training nor particular drafting skills; his talent rather resided in the ability to employ gifted designers, often amongst high society, and guiding them to transform his imagination into reality.

His chief designer was Mr. Adolph Klety, specialized in conceiving formal platinum and diamond jewelry, in a style that Flato described as “drippy”, while for more urbane and witty pieces he employed Mr. George Headley, a particularly creative and imaginative designer: one of his most famous pieces was a necklace that featured sheets of gold on which the giver would write a love letter, then torn into fragments and assembled on a chain.

George Headley, at Flato's New York boutique, ca. 1936.

George Headley, at Flato's New York boutique, ca. 1936.

Diamond and gold bow and flower motif cascade necklace, designed by Headley for Flato, ca. 1938.

Diamond and gold bow and flower motif cascade necklace, designed by Headley for Flato, ca. 1938.

Sugarloaf cabochon sapphire, carved emerald and diamond brooch, ca.1937.

Sugarloaf cabochon sapphire, carved emerald and diamond brooch, Paul Flato,  ca.1937.

Paul Flato, smartly, looked for talent also amongst high society socialites, working with Mrs. Josephine Forrestal and Mrs. Millicent Rogers. Mrs. Forrestal, former Vogue editor and wife of Mr. James V. Forrestal, Secretary of the U.S. Navy, was specialised in designs based on old antique pieces, of which the most famous are the “wiggly clips”, diamond brooches styled after en tremblant 1 jewels.

The Forrestal couple at the White House, in January 1945, during Roosevelt's 4th US Presidential Inauguration.

The Forrestal couple at the White House, in January 1945, during Roosevelt's 4th US Presidential Inauguration.

Ruby and diamond brooch, attributed to Paul Flato, ca. 1936.

Ruby and diamond brooch, attributed to Paul Flato, ca. 1936.

A pair of highly articulated emerald bead, diamond and platinum clip brooches, ca.1936.

A pair of highly articulated emerald bead, diamond and platinum clip brooches, Paul Flato, ca.1936.

Mrs. Rogers, Standard oil fortune heiress and legendary style icon, sketched the “fat heart” brooches, of which perhaps the most famous is a large ruby heart, worn extensively by her, that featured a sapphire swag with the motto “verbum carro”, the world made flesh, pierced by a yellow diamond arrow.

Millicent Rogers wearing the Flato puffy heart in Harper’s Bazaar, October 1938.

Millicent Rogers wearing the Flato puffy heart in Harper’s Bazaar, October 1938.

Millicent Roger's heart: a ruby, sapphire, yellow diamond and enamel brooch, Paul Flato, ca. 1938.

Millicent Roger's heart: a ruby, sapphire, yellow diamond and enamel brooch, Paul Flato, ca. 1938.

 

A puffy heart gold ring with rubies and diamonds, attributed to Paul Flato, ca.1940.

A puffy heart gold ring with rubies and diamonds, attributed to Paul Flato, ca.1940.

However, Paul Flato’s most notable collaboration has been undoubtedly the one with Fulco Santostefano della Cerda, Duke of Verdura, a Sicilian aristocrat.

Introduced to Flato by Diana Vreeland after leaving Chanel, Verdura had a lot in common with Paul: charming and social, he loved to design colorful bold pieces inspired by religious and supernatural subjects, such as angels and mythological and astronomical imagery.

Fulco Verdura’s design pieces were so charismatic that Paul Flato had to market them “Verdura for Flato” , but nevertheless in 1939 Verdura decided to open his own boutique continuing to design extraordinary jewels.

Duke Fulco di Verdura presenting Coco Chanel with her Maltese Cross bracelet, ca. 1935.

Duke Fulco di Verdura presenting Coco Chanel with her Maltese Cross bracelet, ca. 1935.

Verdura for Flato, Aquamarine and Ruby Belt Necklace, ca. 1935.

Verdura for Flato, Aquamarine and Ruby Belt Necklace, ca. 1935.

 

A platinum and diamond brooch, attributed to Verdura for Flato, ca.1940.

A platinum and diamond brooch, attributed to Verdura for Flato, ca.1940.

In 1938 Flato decided to open a second store in Hollywood opposite the notorious Trocadero supper club where his jewelry pieces were well suited to the fashionable stars of the film industry.

Building both personal and professional ties, Paul Flato’s jewels rapidly started to appear in Hollywood productions, 5 in total, and worn by such stars as Katherine Hepburn, Rita Hayworth and Greta Garbo.

Paul Flato's Los Angeles boutique, ca.1938.

Paul Flato's Los Angeles boutique, ca.1938.

Katherine Hepburn, wearing Paul Flato's jewels, in "Holiday", 1938.

Katherine Hepburn, wearing Paul Flato's jewels, in "Holiday", 1938.

 

Greta Garbo, wearing Paul Flato's jewels, in "Two faced woman", 1941.

Greta Garbo, wearing Paul Flato's jewels, in "Two faced woman", 1941.

His pieces, very much in style with the times, featured large-scale shapes and could be worn in multiple ways; famous examples were Joan Crafword’s ruby and diamond necklace created with Verdura and Marlene Dietrich emerald and diamond bracelet.

Gold bracelet set with white diamonds and aquamarine, by Paul Flato, ca.1940.

Gold bracelet set with white diamonds and aquamarine, by Paul Flato, ca.1940.

Gold brooch set with sapphires and white diamonds, by Paul Flato, ca. 1940.

Gold brooch set with sapphires and white diamonds, by Paul Flato, ca. 1940.

Diamond necklace, by Paul Flato, ca.1940.

Diamond necklace, by Paul Flato, ca.1940.

Unfortunately Paul Flato’s career draw to a halt in the early 1940’s when the loss of a 17ct emerald cut diamond, left on consignment in New York, brought to light his bad habit of raising cash through the sale of consigned goods. Unable to pay off his consignors, in 1943 he was convicted of grand larceny and sentenced to 18 months at the infamous Sing Sing prison, U.S.A..

After his release, Paul Flato had a brief experience at producing compacts and pens before making again ill-advised financial decisions under the influence of a dishonest fortune teller. This time, to avoid prison in the United States, he fled to South America and desperately plead guilty to lesser, unrelated charges in Mexico: however he ultimately ended up serving 4 years in Lecumberri prison, Mexico, and other 5 years in Sing Sing, U.S.A..

Such events would have taken a toll on anyone, but Paul Flato, persevering and ambitious as he was, in 1970 returned to Mexico City to open his new boutique in the fashionable area of Zona Rosa. Continuing to design his bold coloured and exuberant creations he draw inspiration from Mexico’s indigenous culture.

Gold "double longhorn" bracelet set with rubies, by Paul Flato, ca.1980.

Gold "double longhorn" bracelet set with rubies, by Paul Flato, ca.1980.

Gold "Mexican coins" bracelets, by Paul Flato, ca. 1980.

Gold "Mexican coins" bracelets, by Paul Flato, ca. 1980.

Gold "tiger" necklace set with diamonds, by Paul Flato, late 1980's.

Gold "tiger" necklace set with diamonds, by Paul Flato, late 1980's.

At age 90, after a long and eventful career, he decided to move back to Texas to spend his final years with his family: Paul Flato died, on July 17th, 1999, surrounded by his loved ones.

Unquestionably one of the most talented jewelers of the 20th century, Paul Flato perhaps paid to harshly the price of his mistakes, although incredibly talented, his ephemeral success found its biggest limit in his jaunty personality.

Luckily for us, his legacy still endures through his extraordinary designs.

Milan, 2021

en tremblant1:  A brooch, pendant, "aigrette" or "hair ornament" decorated with a flower or other motif that has at the top stiff projecting wires (embellished with gemstones) that tremble when the piece is subjected to any movement. Sometimes the projections are finely coiled silver springs, such as were used in the 18th century, but some examples were made with tubular stems enclosing a strip of steel spring.

SHARE THIS ARTICLE


SOURCES
  • Elizabeth Irvine Bray. Paul Flato, jeweler to the stars. Antique Collectors' Club, 2010.
  • Sotheby's.
  • Christie's.
  • Siegelson.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR
Federico Niki Vescovi fine jewelry advisor profile photo shira ghaffari executive team
Federico Niki Vescovi

Fine Jewelry Advisor & Operations Director

Born and raised in the fine jewelry world, after studying law, Federico decided to pursue is passion for the fine arts. He joined the firm in 2015 and over the years acquired valuable professional expertise helping international clients grow and strengthen their position in the fine jewelry market.

Federico's thirst for knowledge and desire to be constantly up-to-date on market trends and new technologies whilst protecting cultural heritage have made him, over the years, a resourceful advisor with talented strategic thinking.

 


WANT TO LEARN MORE ABOUT OUR ORDER MANAGEMENT SERVICE?

WANT TO LEARN MORE ABOUT OUR ORDER MANAGEMENT SERVICE?


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Back to a World of Jewelry
PAUL FLATO:

RISE AND FALL OF ONE OF AMERICA'S GREATEST JEWELERS


As part of Shira Ghaffari’s series of articles exploring the jewelry world, we look into the extraordinary life and works of American jeweler, Paul Flato.


Flamboyant, creative and controversial: Paul Flato is definitely one of the most intriguing figures in American jewelry history. Celebrated in the pages of Vogue and Harper’s Bazaar, his stylish and innovative designs made him a star amongst stars: between the 1930’s and the 1940’s, America’s high society enjoyed enthusiastically Flato’s jewelry, from Los Angeles to New York City, everyone wore his creations.

His story is as fascinating as his pieces and depicts the rise and downfall of a dazzling man who’s fame and misfortunes can be attributed to his outgoing and daring personality.

Paul Flato portait, ca.1937.

Paul Flato portait, ca.1937.

Paul Edmund Flato was born in 1900 in Shiner, Texas, into an upper class family who exposed him from childhood to high society’s fashionable and elegant style: privileged and with a keen eye for beauty, he developed quickly a witty imagination.

After graduating from high school, he decided to attend the University of Texas, in Austin, as a pre-med student, but his college career wasn’t very fruitful as after only passing a few exams he realised that a medical future wasn’t for him.

Driven by ambition, in 1920, he left once again to study economics at Columbia University, in New York City; unfortunately, this time, his academic career was halted by his family, who cut him off from his allowance after refusing their pleas to come home.

Paul Flato, ca.1904.

Paul Flato, ca.1904.

Paul Flato with his father, ca.1935.

Paul Flato with his father, ca.1935.

Nevertheless, stubborn and determined as he was, he decided to stay in the big apple and make a name for himself. After dropping out of University, he began working as an apprentice with jeweler Edmund Frisch on 576th Fifth Avenue.


Charming and entertaining, Paul Flato, in just a couple of years, thanks to the remnants of his allowance, the help of a friend at Tiffany & Co. and his increasingly upscale connections, was able to open his own jewelry shop at One East 57th street, at the corner of 5th Avenue, in Manhattan.

Edmund Frisch pearl brooch adv., ca.1938.

Edmund Frisch pearl brooch adv., ca.1938.

Paul Flato's New York boutique, ca.1933.

Paul Flato's New York boutique, ca.1933.

His early career was strictly intertwined with old relations at Columbia University, as friends matured, they needed graduation gifts and engagements rings, so Paul Flato’s business steadily grew: by the age of 27, he had already achieved over $1 million worth of sales.

In the late 1930’s Paul Flato began to establish a business relationship with a then relatively unknown diamond wholesale dealer, named Harry Winston, becoming rapidly his largest client.

Notable examples of this collaboration include a strand of eighty-five graduated natural pearls clasped by Golconda diamond, 4ct, and a necklace designed by Flato to compliment Harry Winston’s famous Jonker diamond, 125.65ct.

Brenda Frazier, Debutante of the year, modeling the Jonker diamond, 1938.

Brenda Frazier, Debutante of the year, modeling the Jonker diamond, 1938.

Detail of Harry Winston's Jonker white diamond, 125.65ct, set into a necklace by Paul Flato, 1938.

Detail of Harry Winston's Jonker white diamond, 125.65ct, set into a necklace by Paul Flato, 1938.

Paul Flato’s ideas were often theatrical, his wit and imagination were always displayed with originality through his pieces.

Famous examples include the “Deaf and Dumb” brooch series, thought to be inspired by Flato’s own hearing impairment, and singular creations, in fashion with the artistic movements of the time, styled as cactuses, radishes, nuts, bolts, envelopes, gold boxer shorts and feet.

Pair of diamond, ruby and gold brooches by Paul Flato, ca.1940.

Pair of diamond, ruby and gold brooches by Paul Flato, ca.1940.

Emerald and diamond brooches by Paul Flato, ca. 1940.

Emerald and diamond brooches by Paul Flato, ca. 1940.

Nut and Bolt 18K gold cufflinks by Paul Flato, ca. 1960.

Nut and Bolt 18K gold cufflinks by Paul Flato, ca. 1960.

Despite creating some of the most extraordinary pieces of his time, Paul Flato did not have a design training nor particular drafting skills; his talent rather resided in the ability to employ gifted designers, often amongst high society, and guiding them to transform his imagination into reality.

His chief designer was Mr. Adolph Klety, specialized in conceiving formal platinum and diamond jewelry, in a style that Flato described as “drippy”, while for more urbane and witty pieces he employed Mr. George Headley, a particularly creative and imaginative designer: one of his most famous pieces was a necklace that featured sheets of gold on which the giver would write a love letter, then torn into fragments and assembled on a chain.

George Headley, at Flato's New York boutique, ca. 1936.

George Headley, at Flato's New York boutique, ca. 1936.

Diamond and gold bow and flower motif cascade necklace, designed by Headley for Flato, ca. 1938.

Diamond and gold bow and flower motif cascade necklace, designed by Headley for Flato, ca. 1938.

Sugarloaf cabochon sapphire, carved emerald and diamond brooch, ca.1937.

Sugarloaf cabochon sapphire, carved emerald and diamond brooch, Paul Flato, ca.1937.

Paul Flato, smartly, looked for talent also amongst high society socialites,  working with Mrs. Josephine Forrestal and Mrs. Millicent Rogers. Mrs. Forrestal, former Vogue editor and wife of Mr. James V. Forrestal, Secretary of the U.S. Navy, was specialised in designs based on old antique pieces, of which the most famous are the “wiggly clips”, diamond brooches styled after en tremblant1 jewels.

The Forrestal couple at the White House, in January 1945, during Roosevelt's 4th US Presidential Inauguration.

The Forrestal couple at the White House, in January 1945, during Roosevelt's 4th US Presidential Inauguration.

Ruby and diamond brooch, attributed to Paul Flato, ca. 1936.

Ruby and diamond brooch, attributed to Paul Flato, ca. 1936.

A pair of highly articulated emerald bead, diamond and platinum clip brooches, ca.1936.

A pair of highly articulated emerald bead, diamond and platinum clip brooches, Paul Flato, ca.1936.

Mrs. Rogers, Standard oil fortune heiress and legendary style icon, sketched the “fat heart” brooches, of which perhaps the most famous is a large ruby heart, worn extensively by her, that featured a sapphire swag with the motto “verbum carro”, the world made flesh, pierced by a yellow diamond arrow.

Millicent Rogers wearing the Flato puffy heart in Harper’s Bazaar, October 1938.

Millicent Rogers wearing the Flato puffy heart in Harper’s Bazaar, October 1938.

Millicent Roger's heart: a ruby, sapphire, yellow diamond and enamel brooch, Paul Flato, ca. 1938.

Millicent Roger's heart: a ruby, sapphire, yellow diamond and enamel brooch, Paul Flato, ca. 1938.

 

A puffy heart gold ring with rubies and diamonds, attributed to Paul Flato, ca.1940.

A puffy heart gold ring with rubies and diamonds, attributed to Paul Flato, ca.1940.

However, Paul Flato’s most notable collaboration has been undoubtedly the one with Fulco Santostefano della Cerda, Duke of Verdura, a Sicilian aristocrat.

Introduced to Flato by Diana Vreeland after leaving Chanel, Verdura had a lot in common with Paul: charming and social, he loved to design colorful bold pieces inspired by religious and supernatural subjects, such as angels and mythological and astronomical imagery.

Fulco Verdura’s design pieces were so charismatic that Paul Flato had to market them “Verdura for Flato” , but nevertheless in 1939 Verdura decided to open his own boutique continuing to design extraordinary jewels.

Duke Fulco di Verdura presenting Coco Chanel with her Maltese Cross bracelet, ca. 1935.

Duke Fulco di Verdura presenting Coco Chanel with her Maltese Cross bracelet, ca. 1935.

Verdura for Flato, Aquamarine and Ruby Belt Necklace, ca. 1935.

Verdura for Flato, Aquamarine and Ruby Belt Necklace, ca. 1935.

 

A platinum and diamond brooch, attributed to Verdura for Flato, ca.1940.

A platinum and diamond brooch, attributed to Verdura for Flato, ca.1940.

In 1938 Flato decided to open a second store in Hollywood opposite the notorious Trocadero supper club where his jewelry pieces were well suited to the fashionable stars of the film industry.

Building both personal and professional ties, Paul Flato’s jewels rapidly started to appear in Hollywood productions, 5 in total, and worn by such stars as Katherine Hepburn, Rita Hayworth and Greta Garbo.

Paul Flato's Los Angeles boutique, ca.1938.

Paul Flato's Los Angeles boutique, ca.1938.

Katherine Hepburn, wearing Paul Flato's jewels, in "Holiday", 1938.

Katherine Hepburn, wearing Paul Flato's jewels, in "Holiday", 1938.

 

Greta Garbo, wearing Paul Flato's jewels, in "Two faced woman", 1941.

Greta Garbo, wearing Paul Flato's jewels, in "Two faced woman", 1941.

His pieces, very much in style with the times, featured large-scale shapes and could be worn in multiple ways; famous examples were Joan Crafword’s ruby and diamond necklace created with Verdura and Marlene Dietrich emerald and diamond bracelet.

Gold bracelet set with white diamonds and aquamarine, by Paul Flato, ca.1940.

Gold bracelet set with white diamonds and aquamarine, by Paul Flato, ca.1940.

Gold brooch set with sapphires and white diamonds, by Paul Flato, ca. 1940.

Gold brooch set with sapphires and white diamonds, by Paul Flato, ca. 1940.

Diamond necklace, by Paul Flato, ca.1940.

Diamond necklace, by Paul Flato, ca.1940.

Unfortunately Paul Flato’s career draw to a halt in the early 1940’s when the loss of a 17ct emerald cut diamond, left on consignment in New York, brought to light his bad habit of raising cash through the sale of consigned goods. Unable to pay off his consignors, in 1943 he was convicted of grand larceny and sentenced to 18 months at the infamous Sing Sing prison, U.S.A..

After his release, Paul Flato had a brief experience at producing compacts and pens before making again ill-advised financial decisions under the influence of a dishonest fortune teller. This time, to avoid prison in the United States, he fled to South America and desperately plead guilty to lesser, unrelated charges in Mexico: however he ultimately ended up serving 4 years in Lecumberri prison, Mexico, and other 5 years in Sing Sing, U.S.A..

Such events would have taken a toll on anyone, but Paul Flato, persevering and ambitious as he was, in 1970 returned to Mexico City to open his new boutique in the fashionable area of Zona Rosa. Continuing to design his bold coloured and exuberant creations he draw inspiration from Mexico’s indigenous culture.

Gold "double longhorn" bracelet set with rubies, by Paul Flato, ca.1980.

Gold "double longhorn" bracelet set with rubies, by Paul Flato, ca.1980.

Gold "Mexican coins" bracelets, by Paul Flato, ca. 1980.

Gold "Mexican coins" bracelets, by Paul Flato, ca. 1980.

Gold "tiger" necklace set with diamonds, by Paul Flato, late 1980's.

Gold "tiger" necklace set with diamonds, by Paul Flato, late 1980's.

At age 90, after a long and eventful career, he decided to move back to Texas to spend his final years with his family: Paul Flato died, on July 17th, 1999, surrounded by his loved ones.

Unquestionably one of the most talented jewelers of the 20th century, Paul Flato perhaps paid to harshly the price of his mistakes, although incredibly talented, his ephemeral success found its biggest limit in his jaunty personality.

Luckily for us, his legacy still endures through his extraordinary designs.

Milan, 2021

en tremblant1:  A brooch, pendant, "aigrette" or "hair ornament" decorated with a flower or other motif that has at the top stiff projecting wires (embellished with gemstones) that tremble when the piece is subjected to any movement. Sometimes the projections are finely coiled silver springs, such as were used in the 18th century, but some examples were made with tubular stems enclosing a strip of steel spring.

SHARE THIS ARTICLE


SOURCES
  • Elizabeth Irvine Bray. Paul Flato, jeweler to the stars. Antique Collectors' Club, 2010.
  • Sotheby's.
  • Christie's.
  • Siegelson.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR
Federico Niki Vescovi fine jewelry advisor profile photo shira ghaffari executive team
Federico Niki Vescovi

Fine Jewelry Advisor & Operations Director

Born and raised in the fine jewelry world, after studying law, Federico decided to pursue is passion for the fine arts. He joined the firm in 2015 and over the years acquired valuable professional expertise helping international clients grow and strengthen their position in the fine jewelry market.

Federico's thirst for knowledge and desire to be constantly up-to-date on market trends and new technologies whilst protecting cultural heritage have made him, over the years, a resourceful advisor with talented strategic thinking.

 


OUR ORDER MANAGEMENT SERVICE


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BODY: Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velit esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur. Excepteur sint occaecat cupidatat non proident, sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollit anim id est laborum."